When the Rest Fail, Call on Nick Chubb

Cleveland Browns, NFL, Nick Chubb

Over the 22 seasons and 12 head coaches since the Cleveland Browns franchise returned in 1999, they’ve searched for many elusive things. A starting quarterback? Sure. Reliable offensive linemen? Yes. Capable pass rushers? Of course. But the one ingredient that makes the thing work, that turns a franchise from a laughingstock into a contender, is an identity. What has the Browns franchise done well since the return? Phil Dawson has been the only consistent piece the organization could rely on. A kicker. An afterthought until he screwed up. A luxury to have in a blizzard, but not a cornerstone. That was until Nick Chubb.

The Cleveland running back, and Myles Garrett, are the best two players to suit up for the Browns since 1999. And while they charge Garrett with carrying an inordinate load for a weak defense, Chubb’s responsibilities on offense mirror Garrett’s. While Baker Mayfield’s play fluctuates and the wide receiver room fights injury, the burden of scoring points falls on the running game. Kareem Hunt is a splendid runner, Pro Bowler, and dynamic force who will continue to be a key weapon in Kevin Stefanski’s offense. But he isn’t Nick Chubb. For the Browns to make the playoffs, Chubb and the Cleveland offensive line must dominate. The wind and weather have taken hold in northern Ohio, and an already mediocre Mayfield is being managed by his head coach/play caller not to turn the ball over. While the lake effects help the defense hold down opponent’s passing games, they hinder any progress made by the third year quarterback. This is Nick Chubb’s team, and his play alongside the rebuilt offensive line will determine if, and how far, the Browns will play in January.

Chubb’s different because he thinks, then reacts in an instant. Yes, he’s fast. Stronger than most. A powerful runner who doesn’t get stopped with one tackler. But Chubb deciphers good holes from great ones fast. His ability to cut back, and the smarts to make those decisions without pause, separate Chubb from the rest of the league. Chubb’s touchdown run Sundaywas reminiscent of so many of his big runs in his career. Well played from the onset by Houston’s defense, Chubb sensed a weakness on the backside of the defense, made one cut, and dashed into the end zone.

Many of his big runs over his first three years follow the same pattern. Hard running toward a hole, one quick cut, then an explosion into the defensive secondary. Chubb refuses to dilly dally. He’s focused on success. It’s his personality. Nick Chubb wants only to win. His stats are meaningless. The step out of bounds on Sunday proved as much. When the front office signed Kareem Hunt, not once, but twice, Chubb hasn’t complained about losing carries to another back, or when he’ll get his pay day. Chubb is this franchise’s identity.

At 6-3 and with 7 games remaining, the weeding out of the AFC has yet to occur. Nine teams are 6-3 or better. Seven make the playoffs. Games against Philadelphia, Jacksonville, and the New York teams are must haves. Match-ups against Tennessee and Baltimore will decide their fate. The franchise has struggled down the stretch of seasons in the last two decades in which a playoff berth was on the line. This time should be different. Chubb and Kareem Hunt, along with a strong offensive line in front of them, give the Browns go to scorers. The team knows who’ll get the ball in the closing minutes, and they have confidence of success. Can they win a playoff game this way? With their erratic play at quarterback and, despite the past two games’ performances, a still shoddy defense, a long run in January is improbable. But in Cleveland, just getting in has been impossible.

The Eagles come to Cleveland Sunday, a mess of a team. Injuries have plagued the franchise since their Super Bowl win, and with a loss to the Giants last Sunday, we can’t consider them a favorite in the worst division in football. Carson Wentz is a shell of his former self. His confidence is shot. He leads the league in interceptions and times sacked. While Philly is the 10th ranked run offense in the league, their passing attack ranks 27th. The Eagles want to win the same way as the Browns. They’ll try to run it at Cleveland’s defense on Sunday, taking the game out of a mistake prone Wentz’s hands. Myles Garrett and the front four will need to take advantage when Wentz drops back in the pocket. Forcing a couple turnovers early will put Philly in uncomfortable spots on offense. Pressure, again, is key.

The Eagle defense is stout against the pass (6th in the league), but ranks 26th against the run. Guess what the game plan will be again this week? Houston did a fine job for three quarters containing the Browns running game, but Chubb and Hunt wore them down in the fourth. It’s November alongside Lake Erie, so weather will always be a factor. The recipe remains the same. The Browns will run the ball, look for Mayfield to make a few throws in key spots, and hope for big plays from the defense. Philly is fragile and should fold. Another must win against an inferior opponent at home on Sunday.

The Whip Around

1.55 drop backs for Alex Smith on Sunday makes for some queasy moments, but him just being on the field is inspiring. Smith was told he could die, might have his leg amputated, had a chance of not walking again, and would never see a football field. Though it can be nerve racking to watch Smith being chased by defenders, the decision belongs only to him and his family, and he deserves this. The work Smith has put in, and the courage to play the game he loves, is enough. Smith was brilliant on Sunday, throwing for 390 yards and nearly leading Washington to a comeback victory over Detroit. But that he was there, on his terms, matters most. The Comeback Player of the Year award in 2020 is an easy decision.

2. The New York Giants are 3-7, their quarterback has more turnovers than anyone in the league not named Carson Wentz, their best player exited the season long ago with an ACL injury, and they feel like the best team in their division. Dumpster fires and train wrecks are jealous of the NFC East. But Daniel Jones completed 75% of his passes Sunday, didn’t turn the ball over, and ran for 64 yards and a touchdown. Darius Slayton continues to make plays in the passing game and Wayne Gallman Jr. ran for two TDs, but the Giant defense has surged in recent weeks, giving New York life where none should exist. James Bradberry (12th rated corner by Pro Football Focus) is holding opposing quarterbacks to a 77.5 rating when throwing in his direction, has 3 picks, and leads the league with 14 passes defended. Linebacker Blake Martinez tops the NFL in tackles. Leonard Williams and Dexter Lawrence have combined for 8 sacks, 23 pressures, and 9 knockdowns. If you’re looking to pick a winner of this moribund division, you could do worse.

3. Green Bay is 7-2 and scuffling. Tied for the best record in the NFC with New Orleans, something is off. The Packers struggled to put away Jacksonville and backup quarterback Jake Lutton on Sunday in Lambeau, and while Aaron Rodgers’ numbers look fine (24-34, 325, 2 TDs, 1 INT) he misses a throw or two each game he didn’t in the past (the interception on Sunday is a prime example). Most concerning for Green Bay, however, has to be their lack of pressure on defense. Za’Darius Smith has 8 sacks, the rest of the team has 12. They’ve generated just 20 hurries and 14 knockdowns of opposing QB’s on the season. All the contenders in the NFC have exposed flaws over the past few weeks, and with Rodgers at quarterback, the Packers level of worry is low. But without more of a pass rush, it’s tough to see them duplicating their run to the NFC title game from last season.

4. One problem Green Bay doesn’t have is at wide receiver. Davante Adams is top five in the league. He seems to make a catch like this each week.

5. The other NFC leader at 7-2, New Orleans, has seemed off all season, too. But a defeat of Tampa on Sunday night two weeks ago followed by a convincing victory over injury ravaged San Francisco on Sunday has the arrows swinging in the proper direction. The Saints biggest worry early in the season was Hall of Famer Drew Brees’ noodle arm. Brees is completing 73% of his passes, thrown 18 TDs to 3 picks, and, despite the outcry over his missing deep ball, his 7.63 adjusted net yards per pass attempt is 7th in the league. Now the concern becomes his broken ribs and collapsed lung. Brees suffered significant injuries on Sunday and will miss 2-3 weeks. Now Sean Payton has to decide who will get the snaps at QB in Brees’ absence.

6. Will Payton lean on his love child, Taysom Hill, or turn to heaver Jameis Winston? A move to Hill would signal a heavy reliance on the running game, while a Winston nod opens up the deep ball and buckets of turnovers. Winston threw 30 picks last season. It’s a problem he’s unlikely to fix, but New Orleans offense will score with him behind center and Emmanuel Sanders would become a more prevalent part of the offense. But Payton’s soft spot for Hill is borderline psychotic. Shuffling him in and out for a handful of plays per game is one thing; handing him the reins to the offense of a Super Bowl hopeful team is another. The bet here is Winston starts, but with more than a little Hill sprinkled in.

7. Each season begins with another rookie Lions running back, poised to take over the position and relieve pressure off of Matthew Stafford. Like the Lions, every candidate falls on his face. Enter D’Andre Swift. Given double digit carries in back-to-back weeks for the first time this season, Swift has rushed for 145 yards the last two games, but makes a bigger difference in the passing game. After sporadic use early in the season, he’s up to 31 catches this season, averaging 9 yards per grab. He’s scored 6 times on the season, giving Detroit’s offense someone to pressure defenses with Kenny Golladay battling injuries most of the season. Look, Detroit will continue to blow leads and lose to inferior opponents. That’s how they’re wired. But maybe Swift will give them and Stafford a reliable, dynamic force in the backfield.

8. Man, is Tua Tagovailoa something. This throw to Mike Gesicki, on the move in between three defenders, is so gorgeous. This kid has the goods.

9. Kyler Murray to DeAndre Hopkins is the most electric connection in the game. Murray has grown into a fringe MVP candidate and Hopkins has become the undisputed best wideout in the NFL this season. Arizona is tied for the lead in the toughest division in football because no one can stop these two. Murray’s running ability creates a pause for every defender on the field; they have to be cognizant of the fact he can house it on any play. The extra tick of room this gives receivers is important. But when all else fails, and your QB can throw it up, and your wide receiver can make this play? Game over.

10. Two 2019 AFC playoff teams, struggling, meet in Week 11 and the loser faces some trouble. Lamar Jackson has failed to replicate last year’s MVP season, and Ryan Tannehill is coming off a pedestrian performance in a blowout loss against division rival Indianapolis. Baltimore has lost 2 of 3, Tennessee 3 of 4. With the AFC stacking up at the top, another loss adds to the snowballing effect for the loser. Which quarterback turns it around? Who establishes the power run game first? Tennessee ousted Baltimore in last year’s playoffs by grabbing an early lead and forcing Jackson to play catch up. The Titan defense is middling this season, 17th in points allowed, 17th in rushing yards per game, and 27th against the pass. Baltimore pounced on opponents last season, overwhelming teams with their speed to put games out of reach before halftime. The Ravens need to return to their power running game and dominate a lackluster defense. The Titans have games against Indy, Cleveland, and Green Bay remaining. A loss would leave them scrambling. Can they get hot down the stretch once again?

All stats courtesy of pro-football-reference.com

The Media Can’t Wait to Tell You About Odell Beckham

Cleveland Browns, NFL, Odell Beckham

They make everything difficult. The wins seem like losses. The losses feel like organizational failures. The Cleveland Browns are tough to watch and hard to root for. Players fight with the media, coaches, and the medical staff. The pressure to win this season was too much, and no one in the building proved capable of relieving it. Through all of this, however, the Browns will most likely finish 8-8, their best record since 2007. Unlike the years between then and now, playoff talent is in the building. The thought of massive trades and a total remake of the coaching staff is insanity. If every team behaved so irrationally, Bill Belichick would be the only coach in the league with job security.

Rumors flew Sunday morning following a Jay Glazer report that Odell Beckham Jr. was unhappy in Cleveland and had been telling opposing players and coaches to “Come get me.” If true, not the greatest look. Here’s what Beckham’s been through since March, however.

Traded from a franchise and city he enjoyed playing for.
Reunited with his best friend, igniting Super Bowl buzz in his new locale.
Tasked with learning a new offense while dealing with lingering injuries, curtailing his practice time.
Continually targeted by the NFL for uniform violations often overlooked when donned by others.
Bothered throughout the season by a sports hernia that will require off-season surgery.

Visor look familiar? Beckham had to change his Week 2 against the Jets. Murray played entire game with his.

Beckham loves attention and has brought some of these troubles on himself. Is that an indictable offense? What was your last Facebook post about? How many pics have you posted on the ‘Gram today? Face it, everyone wants attention, posting their thoughts and pictures for the world to see hoping to get noticed. The difference is Odell owns that spotlight. He generates clicks and likes for everyone. He draws more traffic than another think piece on what’s happened to Rashard Higgins. If there’s smoke around Beckham, reporters will create a wildfire.

Beckham’s signed through 2023 at salaries of 14.2, 15.7, 15, and 15 million per year, not exorbitant for a player with his talent. His teammates seem to like him; he gifted them his Nike Air Max 720s this week. Freddie Kitchens claims to have a good relationship with the wide receiver. Beckham tweeted last week he didn’t want out of Cleveland. If he wants to be somewhere else, he hasn’t fractured the team because of it.

Beckham’s at the top of the screen in orange socks. That’s the guy who’s a headache and distraction?

In 2007, Kobe Bryant wanted out of Los Angeles. He went on a radio show with Stephen A. Smith and stated he would like a trade out of LA. Bryant said he’d been lied to by the organization and wasn’t confident they’d surround him with the talent needed to win titles. He said nothing could be done to repair the relationship.

How many games did Bryant play for another organization?

While Odell may want traded, the franchise doesn’t have to oblige him. His contract is team friendly and, whether he wants out or not, his best friend is still in Cleveland. This gives the Browns an advantage, a way to massage the relationship. Though Beckham draws attention, he doesn’t seem the type to ignite the situation with an Antonio Brown or Le’Veon Bell power move. Don’t panic.

Beckham hasn’t pulled a Kobe in Cleveland. Maybe he wants out. Or maybe he’s going through something personal. A trade wouldn’t rectify these problems. The past year has been a whirlwind, and he hasn’t been healthy. After the season, talk to him. Get Jarvis Landry, John Dorsey, Baker Mayfield, and receivers coach Adam Henry in a room with Odell. Find out what’s going on, and what he wants. Better yet, do this with the entire team.

Transparency among the front office, coaching staff, and players will provide the building blocks for what this organization needs: stability. The 2019 season cratered because 53 players, a coaching staff, and a front office were searching for different things in opposing directions. Instead of firing coaches and trading talent to lay blame for not meeting expectations, exercise some maturity. The 2020 season and beyond depends on it.

The play of Sheldon Richardson deserves a mention. If not for Joe Schobert, Richardson would be the MVP of the defense. Far and away the best run stopper on the team, he moves well laterally, clogging opposing teams’ running lanes. He’s stepped up his pass rush since Myles Garrett’s suspension as well, tallying all 3 of his sacks and 4 of his 5 quarterback hits since the 1st Pittsburgh game.

A sequence of plays on Sunday highlights his worth on defense. The Bengals had driven into the red zone with the Browns leading, 7-3. Richardson tackled Giovani Bernard for a 2 yard loss on second down then sacked Andy Dalton on third, single-handedly forcing Cincinnati to settle for a field goal. A touchdown could have devastated the team’s already weak psyche. Often overlooked, Richardson has proved to be another excellent addition by John Dorsey.

The Whip Around

1.No more Rams predictions here. They could lose out or make the Super Bowl and neither result would surprise me. A dominant performance against Seattle on Sunday night featured last year’s Jared Goff (293 yards, 2 touchdowns) and Todd Gurley (113 total yards and a touchdown). A defense featuring Aaron Donald, Jalen Ramsey, and Dexter Fowler Jr. can shut down offenses. The team has experience navigating the playoffs. Have the inconsistent Goff and (maybe? probably?) injured Gurley hit their stride? A team no one will want to play come January.

2. With Kirk Cousins at quarterback and injuries bothering Adam Thielen and Dalvin Cook, the Minnesota defense must step up. Danielle Hunter got the memo, posting 3 sacks in the 1st half against Detroit along with 3 other quarterback hits and 3 more tackles for loss. He’s fourth in the league in sacks, 11th in quarterback hits, and fourth in tackles for loss. Hunter is making a case for Defensive Player of the Year. The Vikings need everything they can get out of Hunter. Average against the run(11th) and pass(16th) on defense, they’ll need Hunter to slow down the Chargers’ and Packers’ offenses in the next two weeks if they hope to hold off the Rams for the last NFC Wild Card spot.

3. Run Kyler Murray, Run

4. Devlin Hodges has played well enough to keep the Steelers in the playoff hunt. He isn’t turning the ball over and hits just enough deep shots to his receivers to put up the 20 points on the scoreboard his defense needs for Pittsburgh to sneak away victorious. Good luck listening to a Steeler game, however. I expect Al Michaels and Cris Collinsworth to come armed with duck calls in the booth Sunday night. Whether it’s the studio guys, the play-by-play announcer, or the color man, they waste no opportunity to call Hodges “Duck”. They’re all giddy with excitement over the goofy nickname, laughing and chortling for 3 hours like school girls. We get it, he has an odd nickname. He likes to duck hunt and won calling contests, how original. The broadcast sounds like a kindergarten classroom after a duck, duck, goose game has broken out. Can we move on?

5. The George Kittle play is the stuff of legends. Who doesn’t love watching a tight end shed blockers for 30 yards? Helluva win by the Niners.

6. The Chiefs proved able to beat the Patriots on Sunday, but how will that game look in a month and a half? New England is going through their yearly swoon and though Tom Brady seems poised for an old folks home, K.C. wasn’t dominant. Patrick Mahomes looks good, not great, and deals with a new injury each week. New England forced overtime twice, only to have 2 touchdowns taken away by the referees. Despite the win, the Chiefs will most likely have to come back to Gillette Stadium for the rematch in January. Andy Reid against Bill Belichick in New England in January? I know who I’ll have in that one.

7. Jameis Winston has thrown five pick sixes this year. FIVE. A handful of quarterbacks rank behind him with 2. He leads the league in interceptions with 23. The next closest is Baker Mayfield with 16. Now the good news. He’s second in the league with 26 touchdown passes and 4115 passing yards. Winston turns 26 in January and will be a free agent in March. What the Bucs do with him is anyone’s guess. His completion percentage could be higher (61%), and he takes a lot of sacks (41), but damn is he talented. If Tampa declines to sign Winston to another contract, here’s betting someone will throw gobs of money at him. Teams can live with the completion percentage and sacks if he cuts out the picks. Some QB hungry team will make a bet their offensive coordinator will be the one to straighten him out.

8. Someone take the NFC East out back and shoot it. I’m sick of watching these teams, always in prime time, fumbling over each other. That one of these unworthy franchises will get a home playoff game is criminal. I realize asking the NFL to change a rule is asinine, but please get rid of the division winners getting an automatic home game standard. A playoff berth for one of these dumpster fires is more than enough.

9. The wait continues for a vintage Aaron Rodgers performance. The opportunity arrived on Sunday with Washington in town, and while he’s been efficient, the 350 yard, 4 touchdown games have vanished. Though he’s thrown only 2 picks on the season, is this Rodgers enough to lead the Pack to the Super Bowl? The defense ranks in the 20s against the pass and the run, though they average 1.5 takeaways per game. While 10-3 looks nice and having Aaron Rodgers behind center always gets you a seat at the table, 5 point home wins against horrible teams isn’t inspiring confidence of a January run.

10. Tennessee-Houston
The Game of the Week is in Nashville, featuring an ascending Titans team catching the Texans off an embarrassing home loss to the Broncos. Ryan Tannehill won’t come down to earth, adding a shredding of Oakland’s secondary to his impressive rebound season. If Tannehill and Derrick Henry continue their recent hot streaks, the Titans become a real threat in the AFC. Houston’s defense ranks 25th overall, and without J. J. Watt up front the Texans struggle to pressure the quarterback. The Titans’ defense hasn’t lived up to expectations either however, and their hyped secondary has been bad, surrendering 260 yards per game through the air (teamrankings.com). Deshaun Watson won’t put two dud performances back-to-back. Look for a shootout in Tennessee.

All stats courtesy of pro-football-reference.com.

 

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves

Cleveland Browns, Freddie Kitchens, NFL

There was never a doubt about Sunday. It was a loss in April when the schedule released, a loss during training camp, and a loss now. The way the Browns lose is concerning. When the talent isn’t meeting expectations, turnovers and penalties are mounting, and head scratching decisions are made on the sideline the blame lands in one spot, the head coach.

Freddie Kitchens was the concern heading into the season. Never a head coach at any level, did he possess the traits necessary to guide this out-of-control hype train? His team lacks discipline and does not correct mistakes. Odell Beckham Jr. and Jarvis Landry are the most skilled receiving duo in the league. They have combined for 64 catches and 1 touchdown in seven games. Something ain’t stirring the Kool-Aid.


Kitchens wasn’t ready for all the job entails. The players, management, and ownership were unprepared to handle the attention shone in their direction during the off-season. The 2019 season has been an organizational failure akin to the failures of the last twenty years. Nothing has changed in Cleveland.


Now is when it has to. Don’t fire Freddie. Forget about trading Odell. Don’t give up on Baker. This season has turned from one of hope to one of education. The Browns have detonated everything in the past at the first sign of adversity, leading them into the depths they reside today.


Let Kitchens learn on the job. What are the alternatives? Coach after coach turnstiles through Berea, none given a chance to show growth. Who is great at their job after two months? Who will hire the next coach if he’s fired? Jimmy Haslam has shown zero ability to run a franchise or hire competent help, save for John Dorsey. Why would anyone assume the Haslams will get the next one right? The process, and Dorsey, led the organization to select Freddie Kitchens to lead this team. They saw something in him, giving them faith he could do this. Don’t pull the ripcord now. Give Kitchens a chance to grow.

The turnovers and penalties led to the loss on Sunday. Not much needs rehashed. Until the players take on the responsibility of disciplining themselves on the field, until they decide winning matters, nothing will change. A few observations, however.


Why in the world are teams, and the Browns specifically, guarding Julian Edelman with linebackers and safeties? Edelman is the only pass catcher on New England’s offense that poses a threat to a defense. Instead of letting the Patriots scheme their way into mismatches, why not shadow Edelman with your best corner? Denzel Ward, or even Greedy Williams, should have drawn the assignment of checking the New England wide receiver. Instead, Joe Schobert and backup safety Eric Murray got beat on touchdown catches by Edelman. In certain match-ups, you must adapt the scheme to negate what an opponent wants to do.

Trying to guard Edelman(11) with Schobert(53) in the red zone is criminal


On fourth and seven from the Browns’ 33, New England went for it instead of kicking. The defense was unprepared and had to burn a timeout. On a cold, wet day and the other team employing a shaky kicker who they cut this week, why were they not ready for the possibility Bill Belichick wouldn’t kick? Inexcusable.


A positive from Sunday? The defensive line as a unit and Olivier Vernon were exceptional. Vernon and Myles Garrett recorded sacks, and Larry Ogunjobi and Sheldon Richardson stuffed the run and applied adequate pressure up the middle, preventing Brady from stepping up in the pocket. After a slow start, Vernon has flashed during the last two outings, providing pressure on opposing offenses opposite Garrett.

The recipe this week is the same as it’s been, avoid turnovers and penalties. It’s been a simple yet unattainable goal. They’ve shown no desire to rein in their disorderly tendencies and until that happens the opponent will not matter.


Joe Flacco is injured. The Broncos traded their best wideout, Emmanuel Sanders, to the 49ers last week.


Third year quarterback Brandon Allen has never taken a regular season snap and will start on Sunday. According to Lance Zierlein of the NFL Network, Allen is mobile with a strong arm. He’ll run if the pocket breaks down. Denver will look to pound the running game Sunday.


Phillip Lindsay and Royce Freeman are a strong running back duo. Lindsay is quick, a threat to break a big gainer each time he touches the ball. Freeman is more of a grinder who’ll wear defenses down the more carries he gets. With a young quarterback under center and the Browns defense struggling against the run (ranked 29th in the league) the Broncos have one choice on offense.


Defensively, the Broncos have been stout. Fourth in total yards, fourth against the pass, and 17th against the run, a low-scoring slog is likely on Sunday. Establish Nick Chubb, but continue to work to get Beckham and Landry involved. Von Miller is one of the best pass rushers in the league, yet has struggled a bit this year, only 4 sacks to his credit. Chris Harris Jr. has made 4 Pro Bowls at cornerback, yet is on the wrong side of 30. The Browns offense moves the ball when they avoid mistakes. They should do so Sunday.


The lighter portion of the schedule has arrived. Will the Browns take advantage? The difficulty faced to this point will either sharpen them or break them. Does the team many predicted them to be exist?

The Whip Around


1. Does anyone else in the history of football make this throw?

2. Matt Nagy has to put his players in a better position to succeed. Settling for a 41 yard field goal try, when the team had 43 seconds to improve field position is bush league, and is playing not to lose. Should an NFL kicker make a 41 yarder? Absolutely. But if you can make things easier on your players you do it. That kick isn’t a chip shot outdoors off Lake Michigan in October. Nagy set Eddy Pineiro up to be the scapegoat.

3. Nick Bosa is in the conversation for Defensive Player of the Year. Seven sacks, nine hurries, and six quarterback knockdowns according to pro-football-reference.com, he’s terrorized opposing offenses, grinding them to a halt. The rookie is a star, leading a 49er defense that ranks second in the league in points allowed and 1st in both passing and rushing yards. If those numbers hold, Bosa will have two new trophies on his mantle, DPOY and Rookie of the Year.

4. The Rams have Todd Gurley, Brandin Cooks, and Robert Woods on offense, yet Cooper Kupp is far and away their best weapon. He’s taken ownership of the middle of the field, sitting down in holes against zone coverage and making life easier for Jared Goff. After he catches the ball, he runs. Far. Second only to Austin Ekeler in yards after catch, he and Michael Thomas are the only receivers in the top ten, the rest being running backs. If the Rams make a second half run, Kupp will be a huge reason for it.

Via foxsports.com

5. Andy Reid called a fantastic game for Matt Moore on Sunday night, putting his backup QB in spots to succeed. Moore was efficient and didn’t turn the ball over. For all of Reid’s genius offensively, game situations still confound him, however. Down seven with 5 minutes left at their own 40 and facing a 4th and 3, Reid elected to punt. The Chiefs’ offense wouldn’t see the ball again. Why punt in that situation? Moore was playing well, and K.C. has two of the best short yardage weapons in the game in Travis Kelce and Tyreek Hill. K.C.’s defense was struggling, as they have for two years. Coaches need more aggression in those situations.

6. Derrick Henry dropped the ball on Sunday. He just dropped it. This dude is maddening.

7. Bad offenses are at their worst in goal to go situations. Chicago’s train wreck of a unit fits the bill. First and goal from the 4 with 43 seconds left in the 1st half, they ran for no gain, called a timeout, threw for a one yard gain, called a timeout, then threw incomplete. O.K., bad, but still 25 seconds left. Another run for no gain drained the clock to 1 second before Mitch Trubisky threw incomplete again. Eddy Pineiro kicked a 19 yard field goal. A touchdown there would’ve saved them from needing a field goal at the gun to win. Bad teams do bad things.

8. Buffalo came back to earth Sunday, getting trounced 31-13 at home against Philadelphia at windswept Orchard Park. Philly ran at will, totaling 218 on the ground. Josh Allen isn’t consistent enough for the defense to have off days, and the offense lacks any other play makers. The easy early season schedule may catch up to the Bills.

9. If you can figure out Jameis Winston, Tampa will pay you millions to move to the Gulf Coast of Florida. Here are Sunday’s numbers: 21-43, 301 yards, 2 touchdowns, 2 picks, 2 fumbles, 53 yards rushing. You could see his game ending interception coming from Memphis. It’s the same as watching an old person sliding around on ice. Are they going to fall or catch themselves?

10. Just when Indianapolis looked like it belonged in the conversation with Kansas City and New England, they lay an egg at home against Denver, needing a 51 yard Vinatieri field goal to eke by the Broncos. The defense and running game will keep them in games, but Jacoby Brissett isn’t dynamic enough to win a shootout in the playoffs. The third best team in the AFC is light years behind the front two.