Kevin Stefanski is Set Up to Fail

Cleveland Browns, Jimmy Haslam, Kevin Stefanski

What is one tangible attribute that suggests Kevin Stefanski will be a successful NFL head coach? He’s Ivy League educated. Paul DePodesta wanted to hire him last year instead of Freddie Kitchens. He’ll supposedly agree with hiring Andrew Berry, a former Browns executive now Philadelphia’s Vice President of Football Operations, as G.M. DePodesta, Stefanski, and Berry, in theory, will synergize the business, football, and coaching branches in Cleveland. I’ll ask again. What points to Stefanski having the skills and experience needed to be a successful head coach in Cleveland?

Jimmy Haslam still sits atop the organizational chart. Synergy is an excellent goal and one that all good businesses strive for. But Jimmy Haslam remains. Who will pay for the next slow start, or disappointing season? DePodesta put this together; he’ll be next on the chopping block. How long will his leash be?

Patience in this situation is paramount. First time head coaches need a long leash. Kevin Stefanski is a 37-year-old who has run an NFL offense for 20 games. He’s never been in charge of running a training camp. He’s interviewed with the media sporadically, not forced to sit in front of a microphone multiple times per week. Stefanski hasn’t experienced game day on an NFL sideline in charge of calling plays, challenging bad calls, and managing the game clock. He will make mistakes. A lot of them.

Will the fan base, media, front office, and players have the patience to allow him to fail? With Baker Mayfield, Odell Beckham, Nick Chubb, Jarvis Landry, and Myles Garrett on the roster, tolerance for losing is low. Twenty years of futility and the remnants of a disappointing 6-10 season are all Browns fans have. Will an 8-8 record be good enough to appease the starved fan base?

The patience required to tear down a dysfunctional organization and rebuild it in a manner conducive to consistent winning does not exist. The wounds are too raw; the thirst for wins too present. Kevin Stefanski has to win now, and he has to win big. Baker Mayfield has to become a Pro Bowl quarterback next year under his watch. Nick Chubb needs 275-300 carries, 1500 yards, and 12 touchdowns. Odell Beckham and Jarvis Landry both tallied 1000 yards receiving in down years. The sky is back to being the limit for one of the best wide receiver duos in the league.

They set Kevin Stefanski up to fail. While the organization tries to align all entities, history says the synergy won’t last long. What happens when a disagreement occurs in the draft room? Differing opinions over a free agent? Will the new three-headed decision making body hold hands and do what is best for the Cleveland Browns, or will they do what is best for themselves? Who will Haslam side with once the discord begins? Will he calm the waters once things get choppy? Or will he promote more backstabbing and power hording? Haslam likes the ego stroking that comes with infighting and inter-office politicking. No evidence suggests he has the leadership skills or discipline to create an environment free of this toxicity.

Haslam has proven in the past to be gullible and easily swayed by the last person he’s talked to. DePodesta won this power struggle against John Dorsey, but he’s put himself in the guillotine. Haslam won’t blame himself, won’t step back and let this simmer, and won’t fire another head coach after one year (don’t bet on it!). Any rumblings of discord, or a three game losing streak, or a perceived lack of readiness now rests in DePodesta’s lap. Is this organization now structured to withstand the minor potholes that become road blocks?

What proof is there that Kevin Stefanski can coach an NFL team? There is none. This organization needed a resolute, stable leader who’d been through the fires surrounded by successful people in a winning organization. The franchise needed a shape shifter at its second most important position, someone who knows winning and how to dominate opponents. Another first-year head coach, a roll of the dice, is a recipe for more failure. The best argument for the hire seems to be, “Other lightly regarded candidates have won before, let’s wait and see.” This organization has not earned “wait and see” status.

The Minnesota Vikings have been more successful than the Browns, but they have won nothing of consequence. Mike Zimmer has been their head coach since 2014. They’ve made the playoffs three times and won 2 playoff games, one on a fluke play. The Vikings are always good. Does anyone see greatness from the organization or coaching staff? What schemes or structures are considered innovative? Stefanski had help running their offense, Zimmer didn’t trust him on his own. How much credit should Gary Kubiak get for Minnesota’s offense this year? What did the Vikings do better than anyone else in the league? Who has left and been great anywhere else?

The Browns franchise no longer gets the benefit of the doubt. They’ve proved unable to make even the most basic decisions to field a competent team. It is possible that if you throw enough darts, you’ll eventually hit a bullseye. Even if Kevin Stefanski has the abilities needed to be a successful head coach, however, it is unlikely the environment in Cleveland will allow him to blossom. Good organizations with strong ownership and defined leadership can afford to hire unproven coordinators with strong upside. Unfortunately for Browns’ fans, the one in Berea cannot.

 

There’s Only One Choice for the Next Browns Coach

Cleveland Browns, Jimmy Haslam, Josh McDaniels

The Haslams broke the Cleveland Browns’ organization. The hirings, firings, draft busts, and free agent flops have piled up over two decades. This isn’t a normal situation. Jimmy Haslam has created a toxic environment where backstabbing and shadowy power moves are the norm. Any coach stepping into this labyrinth must have experience, confidence, and a plan. Forget competence as a play caller or scheme designer, those talents should carry no weight during the search because they don’t matter. The new head coach has to build a foundation for everything else to sit. The only guy available with a shot at success is Josh McDaniels.

For the record, I’m stunned that McDaniels has interest with other opportunities available, but still give him only a 15-20% chance at winning in Cleveland. The owner’s tentacles slither throughout the organization and suffocate a once proud franchise. A never-ending power struggle lurks inside the offices in Berea.

To wit:

Haslam hired Joe Banner and Michael Lombardi as team president and general manager after he bought the team. Two experienced football minds, Haslam never defined their roles. The front office was a “top-heavy, confusing mess” according to NFL insiders, and Haslam wanted things streamlined. After Banner and Lombardi fired Rob Chudzinski after one year and hired Mike Pettine, they themselves were canned, and the owner handed Ray Farmer the general manager job.

Farmer drafted Johnny Manziel, a quarterback the head coach wanted no part of. The NFL also caught him texting play calls to offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan during games. Shanahan, under contract, approached the front office with a 32 point PowerPoint presentation asking for release from his contract to become offensive coordinator in Atlanta. They granted it to him. Pettine and Farmer got canned after two seasons. Shanahan is head coach in San Francisco, a Super Bowl favorite.

Sashi Brown became executive vice president and de facto general manager, Paul DePodesta, a baseball executive, took a position as chief strategy officer, and the organization hired Hue Jackson (a hire raved about across the league) while the franchise strategically tanked to horde draft picks. Onboard in the beginning, Jackson grew weary of the losing and complained about the front office and the analytics driven plan of action. Haslam abandons the tank midstream, canning Brown without letting him execute the multi-year tear down necessary to rebuild the talent level in the organization. DePodesta remains, however.

John Dorsey got the G.M. job, and Jackson remained before being fired mid-season in 2018 after continued head butting with offensive coordinator Todd Haley. Dorsey hires Freddie Kitchens, Kitchens bombs, and despite the massive upgrade in talent made to the roster by Dorsey, using the picks and equity obtained by Sashi Brown, loses his job. Though still early, the whispers of a loss in a power struggle with dePodesta seem to have sealed Dorsey’s fate.

John Dorsey was the champion of a total remake of the Cleveland Browns organization four months ago. He drafted Baker Mayfield, Denzel Ward, and Nick Chubb in one draft. Picked Greedy Williams in the second round of the 2019 draft and Mack Wilson in the fifth round. These players will all be in their 2nd or 3rd year in the NFL next year and central to a franchise turnaround.

All drafted by John Dorsey, one of the preeminent talent evaluators in the league. Fired two years after being hired.

A complete and total malfunction of an organization. Coaches and front office executives hired on different timelines with mismatched objectives. None given the proper time to overcome the stench of this franchise. All the names above had success of varying degrees at different locations. While questioned, few of the hires were considered outright disasters when made. Pettine may have been the biggest reach, but if not for his failed tenure in Cleveland, his work with Green Bay’s defense would put him on head coaching lists around the league.

Each change brings a different power structure and alignment. New figures, all uncertain of their roles, all grasping for more power. No one working together. Everyone for themselves, blaming others for the franchise’s problems, searching for selfish solutions to team specific problems.

Greg Roman would be a fine hire for any other organization. He’s proved himself at different stops in the NFL and could very well be an outstanding head coach. Robert Saleh, the 49ers defensive coordinator, is young and smart. Kevin Stefanski, Eric Bieniemy, Mike LaFleur, and Brian Daboll are all fabulous coaches, all deserving of a shot at the head of the table.

But not here.

This job is too much for a first timer. The stress and pull of an NFL head coach is overwhelming for everyone. Time constraints during the week, along with the speed with which they must make decisions on game day, take a toll on all first-year coaches. The politics within the building in Berea, the frustrations from the fans and the media of two decades’ worth of losing, and the expectations to win with this roster will sabotage them. Jimmy Haslam gives them zero chance to succeed.

The franchise needs a strong leader on the sideline, one who has been a head coach before. Mike McCarthy? He’s won a Super Bowl and coached two of the greatest quarterbacks of all time. In parts of 13 seasons in Green Bay, he made the playoffs nine times. But for all his success, McCarthy butted heads with Rodgers; everything from conservative play calling to the blandness of the receiver route tree. Rumors claim that Rodgers would insist receivers run his routes instead of McCarthy’s. The coach abhorred analytics. Does this sound like the mentality needed to reinvent the organization?

Josh McDaniels is the only hope. He’s strong-willed, perhaps too much so. His desire for total control led to his firing in Denver. He seemed out to prove something. Anything. He was right, and you all were wrong. His attitude and desire for control as a 33-year-old first time head coach without a resumé to back up his brashness lead to the quick hook.

McDaniels found his way back to New England after the fiasco in Denver, holding the title of offensive coordinator for the last eight years. The success of New England’s offense under his watch is indisputable. He coordinated the best offense in league history in 2007. They scored the second most points ever (589), have the highest point differential (+315), are tied for the most touchdown passes by a quarterback in a season (Tom Brady, 50), and have the record for most touchdown catches by a player in a season (Randy Moss, 23). He’s been a member of 6 Super Bowl winning teams.

Is this success because of Bill Belichick and Tom Brady? Absolutely. But McDaniels has been there. In the meetings. On the practice field. On the sideline. Making legacy changing play calls on 3rd down in Super Bowls. He’s studied the greatest coach in history his entire career. He’s called plays for the greatest quarterback in history. McDaniels isn’t the reason for the Patriots’ success. But no organization has won for a longer period on time, and he’s been a cog for almost the entire run.

Proximity to greatness is no guarantee of future glory. The organization has no choice, however. The leadership it will take to reinvent Cleveland football is not available. They have pursued every other avenue. All dead ends. McDaniels is imperfect, yet the only viable option.

Success in Cleveland will be virtually impossible. No one can overcome the destruction the Haslam’s have unleashed on a historic franchise with one of the greatest fan bases on earth. The city, the team, the fans; all deserve better. Jimmy and Dee Haslam are incompetent, however. Buffoons, clueless without a touch of self awareness. They shouldn’t be in charge of setting pins in a bowling alley. Yet here we are.

Josh McDaniels is not a perfect choice, and he will most likely fail. Ownership dooms the franchise for the foreseeable future, and it’s a sad reality. But if anyone on the market can rescue this city and franchise, it’s him. God help Browns fans.

 

Blame the Haslams

Cleveland Browns, Jimmy Haslam, Kirk Cousins, NFL

Everyone expected too much of the 2019 Cleveland Browns. It’s easy to look back, after another upsetting loss in Pittsburgh, and diagnose the problems. But what are the solutions?

What will get this organization over the misery and dysfunction? A change of ownership is the clear answer, yet the Haslams are the only untouchables in Berea. It’s hard to fathom the franchise ever reaching the level of competency needed to sustain winning with the current ownership in place. They have no clue what it takes to run an NFL franchise. The checks keep pouring in however, and Jimmy Haslam’s bank account will continue to grow regardless of the mess he makes in Cleveland. With billions of dollars, no one tells you how big a fool you are.

Haslam lacks leadership skills. He established this by the way he ran his previous business. Pilot Flying J truck stops faced a lawsuit and settled with plaintiffs over a fuel rebate scheme in the early 2010s. Whether he led the scheme is inconsequential. Haslam bears the blame. Either he knew about the scam and didn’t stop it or was unaware of a multi-million dollar scheme perpetrated by his company. Which is worse?

It was his company. Haslam’s name was on the door. He signed the checks. It was his responsibility to know the goings-on inside the company and to fix problems before they hurt his employees or customers. Same in Cleveland.

Haslam doesn’t care about people or integrity. He’s a greedy buffoon who inherited a bunch of money, allowing him to make a fool of himself while spending it. His loyalty is only to himself and his dollars. He doesn’t care about the Cleveland Browns and lacks the wherewithal necessary to fix his mess.

Haslam on Sundays

Since the owner is safe, the coach has to go, right? Sure, fire another head coach. A failed strategy for two decades. Freddie Kitchens has struggled this year. His team has lacked discipline and has been unprepared to play on most Sundays. They carry a swagger of a group that’s won Super Bowls without playing a playoff game.

Two questions.

  1. If Haslam fires Freddie, who’s hiring the next guy? The same group that hired Kitchens will lead the search. Is anyone confident they’ll get the next one right? What is in Jimmy Haslam’s background that proves he’s adept at choosing good people to put in important positions? What hire can you point to of his and claim as a success? Even the John Dorsey hire isn’t the slam dunk now that it was a year ago.
  2. What respected, sought after coaching candidate will come near this job? In each of Haslam’s coaching searches, he’s not landed the big fish he’s desired and has had to settle on a backup choice, except for Hue Jackson, the one hire in which Haslam landed his man.

Facts are, NFL types know the problems in Cleveland and want no part of it. Any coach worth his salt will have better opportunities elsewhere and will steer clear of Berea. That leaves passed over assistant coaches, a bargain bin Haslam can then sort through. These guys will carry the same credentials as Kitchens. At least Freddie has gained experience on an NFL sideline as the head man. Give him an off-season to evaluate himself and his team. Something led Dorsey and Haslam to hire Kitchens. The next guy isn’t as good as you think he is. Give this one more than a year to grow into the position.

So if you can’t fire the owner or the head coach, what’s next? Someone has to be held accountable, right?
Bad season.
Fire someone. Anyone.
Repeat.

This doesn’t work. The Browns have shown it doesn’t over two decades. The merry-go-round has to stop. At some point, the organization has to exert some patience. An attempt to build a stable franchise needs to occur. The hysteria and finger pointing over a disappointing season should instead cause an evaluation of the current staff members. What are their strengths and weaknesses? What can the organization do to make them better? How can this franchise put their people in a position to succeed?

Turning this ship around will fall on the players. The talent is there. Baker Mayfield, Myles Garrett, Denzel Ward, Joe Schobert, Jarvis Landry, Nick Chubb, and Odell Beckham Jr. have all proved in their careers they can be successful in the league. How bad do they want it? Are they content cashing checks and going .500, or do they want more? Will they work to fix the problems here(some they’ve caused), or will they demand trades, looking for an easy out?

The upcoming off-season will unveil the character of this roster. The drama of this season will either be an important lesson learned or become a way of life. Do these guys want to be great? Do they desire to change the fortunes of a city and a franchise, or are they comfortable with the status quo?

The Whip Around

1.Kirk Cousins has a history of struggling under the lights and, despite playing better in Seattle, wasn’t good enough for the Vikings. An interception to start the 4th quarter and incomplete passes on 3 of his last 4 throws on Minnesota’s final drive doomed his team. The Vikings are competent and may have a shot to win a playoff game against the NFC East winner. They’re quarterback is inconsistent, however, possessing the Tony Romo gene. When the stakes are highest, no matter how well he’s played, Cousins gives games away.

2. What the hell did Philadelphia do on Sunday? A loss in Miami to a G league team is embarrassing, and the Eagles are no longer getting a pass. I’ve expected the switch to get flipped in Philly, especially with the division so winnable. Carson Wentz has been average, and the defense is just meh, ranking 18th against the run and 13th defending the pass. Surrendering 365 passing yards to Ryan Fitzpatrick, in as winnable a game as exists in the NFL, is upsetting. Despite the Cowboys’ woes, they’re the de facto favorite in the East.

3. Few teams had a stranger season than the Carolina Panthers. After losing their first two games and Cam Newton, the team rallied around Kyle Allen and Christian McCaffrey, winning 5 out of 6. McCaffrey was even getting MVP buzz. Allen would lead Carolina to the playoffs and Newton was out, on to Chicago. Only a month later, they’ve canned Super Bowl coach Ron Rivera, McCaffrey looks human, Kyle Allen has struggled, and the Panthers have lost 4 in a row. Rumors are swirling around Greg Roman, the Baltimore offensive coordinator credited with both Colin Kaepernick’s and Lamar Jackson’s successes, as their next head coach. Cam is on the wrong side of 30 and taken a huge amount of hits in his career. He’s finished the past two seasons on IR. How good do we think Greg Roman is?

4. Onside kicks are impossible to recover since the NFL changed the rules. Enter Younghoe Koo.

5. The annual “The Patriots dynasty is finished and so is Tom Brady” talk started this week, later than usual. Writers and talking heads fell all over themselves to proclaim the Patriots dynasty over. Not buying it. The Patriots are 10-2, tied for the best record in the league. How many years do Belichick and Brady have to rub the Super Bowl trophy in America’s faces before we learn the lesson? The Pats win because they’re smarter and better prepared, not because they have more talent. They’ve established a culture that doesn’t take shortcuts. New England may not win the Super Bowl, but good luck picking against them.

6. San Francisco-Baltimore was December football in its prime. A slug fest in rainy Baltimore, each struggled to establish a passing game. The playoffs will test these two run heavy, defensive minded teams. No one would dispute they’ve been the two best teams over the last month. Can they carry that momentum into January and beat more established quarterbacks in the playoffs? With 2 minutes left and 85 yards needed to advance, will either of these QBs be up to the task?

Just get a Lamar Jackson. Easy way to control that Niner D-Line

7. All those who had Ryan Tannehill leading the Titans to a playoff berth, please rise and get out; you’re a liar. The Tennessee QB was precise on Sunday, completing 17-22 passes for 2 touchdowns in the Titans’ dismantling of the fading Colts. The Titans are always stout on defense and possess a capable running game; the quarterback has prevented them from advancing in the playoffs. Could Tannehill change that? Don’t laugh, he leads the league in passer rating and is completing 73% of his throws. The remaining schedule is tough, facing games in Oakland, home versus New Orleans, and two against Houston. If they can get into the playoffs, however, watch out. Who matches up better against Baltimore?

If Tannehill keeps dropping it in the bucket like this……..

8. The Bills’ defense flexed on the Cowboys Thanksgiving Day, announcing themselves to a national audience as AFC contenders. Consistent all year, they’ve ranked just behind the 49ers and Patriots but added a pass rush. They’ve averaged 5 sacks over their last 3 contests (teamrankings.com), turning a previous weakness into a strength. Ed Oliver, Shaq Lawson, and Jordan Phillips have 9 sacks in those games and dominated Dallas’ vaunted O-line in particular. Weak offensive lines in New England and Kansas City might have a problem on their hands against Buffalo, but Josh Allen still isn’t trustworthy enough to predict any upsets from the Bills.

9. While Baltimore and New England gather all the press clippings, Kansas City lies in the weeds. The forgotten contender, Patrick Mahomes’ injury removed them from our thinking. An easy 40 against Oakland on Sunday should have gotten you reacquainted. When healthy, Mahomes is the best quarterback in the league with the most dangerous weapons. While their defense is suspect, the offense can score at will from anywhere on the field and rarely turns the ball over. New England visits K.C. on Sunday, a colossal test for each team. If the Chiefs can hang 30 on that defense, I suspect the radio silence on the Chiefs will end.

10. San Francisco-New Orleans
Los Angeles Rams-Seattle

The Saints have something to prove Sunday against the 49ers. They’ve struggled in recent weeks against division opponents Carolina and Atlanta. What’s wrong with Alvin Kamara? With only 587 yards rushing and 444 receiving on the season, Drew Brees’ most dangerous weapon seems to fade in and out of games. While Michael Thomas has been otherworldly, New Orleans will need Kamara to slow down the 49er pass rush to have any chance against San Fran.

If the Rams plan on showing up for the 2019 season, now would be the time. A loss here would all but end their playoff hopes. The struggling offense found some footing against the Cardinals; Jared Goff threw for 424 and Todd Gurley ran for 95, but they’re too sporadic to trust. Seattle and Russell Wilson win and put up bags of points in the process. Can the Rams score the 30 necessary to keep up with the Seahawks? Wilson wins games at the end, he’ll do so again Sunday night and put a head scratching L.A. season to bed.

Typical Cleveland Browns Problems, Typical Cleveland Browns Solutions

Baker Mayfield, Cleveland Browns, Jimmy Haslam, Mitchell Trubisky

Time to step back and take a breathe. The Cleveland Browns aren’t making the playoffs in 2019. A winning record doesn’t seem attainable. Over and again, each member of the organization has proved incapable of handling the pressures of the expectations placed on them before the season. A weak schedule can no longer save them. What good are wins over Cincinnati and Miami? They’ll be empty calories, leaving fans hungry for something more significant.


The owner, the general manager, and the fans need to exercise patience. There are a myriad of problems with the roster and the coaching staff, but sweeping changes are not the answer. How often does a coach have to get fired, replaced, then fired again before they end the cycle? The Browns franchise returned in 1999 and has employed 11 head coaches in that time. Eleven coaches in 21 years. That’s obnoxious. The blame is placed at the feet of the wrong people.


Jimmy Haslam and Randy Lerner before him deserve criticism for the incompetence of this franchise for the past two decades. Would you blame the success or failure of General Motors on the line workers? They are the most important cog in the machine to be sure, but workers cannot succeed if they don’t have the correct tools, a safe work environment, and the proper training and education to flourish.


The owners of the Cleveland Browns have provided nothing but a toxic work space for their employees. Haslam hasn’t a clue what it takes to run an NFL franchise. He possesses neither the patience nor the wherewithal to put people in positions to succeed. His bravado and false sense of accomplishment allow him to brush his massive failures aside and place blame on others’ shoulders. A leader holds themselves accountable. Haslam has shown no sign he’s capable of self reflection.


The problems in Cleveland are deeper than the quarterback and coach. A systemic failure at the top of the organization oozes below, infecting the entire system. It’s a pitiful situation, and the fans are the ones who suffer. Firing a coach or replacing a general manager provides the masses with hope but does little to solve the overarching issues. The Cleveland Browns franchise will never win consistently until Jimmy Haslam sells the team, a depressing but true realization of the state of the franchise.


Baker Mayfield and Freddie Kitchens do look lost, however. The defense is regressing. The pressures of the NFL are mounting and no one involved has shown the capability to handle them.


On Sunday, the offense moved the ball and committed zero turnovers. The refs penalized the team only five times. Yet in pressure situations, they failed.


6-15 on third downs.
0-2 on fourth down.
One touchdown in five red zone appearances.


When the moment intensifies, Mayfield and the offense cower. On the season Mayfield in completing 35.9% of his passes inside the 20 yard line, throwing 4 touchdowns compared to 3 interceptions. Last year the numbers were 64.8% completions, 20 touchdowns, and 0 interceptions. What happened?

Mayfield even struggles with a clean pocket


The talent is there. Mayfield has succeeded at every level, including the NFL. Not so long ago, he was the savior. He’s a quarterback with zero confidence. Bad plays have piled up. The expectations and pressure have buried him.


It’s time to give this group a chance to exhale. The final two months of the season may give them that chance. Can they find themselves somewhere under the rubble of the 2019 season?


The record will be a disappointment. Next off-season will offer less distraction. The national media will find the next big thing somewhere else. The Browns will be an afterthought. Is it possible for them to improve under those conditions? Cleveland’s was the third youngest roster entering the season. Contrary to popular belief, young NFL teams don’t make huge leaps from year to year. San Francisco is an exception in 2019, though Jimmy Garoppolo returned after missing all but 3 games last year, and they added the Defensive Rookie of the Year (presumably) in the draft.


Turning players and front office personnel over every other year hasn’t worked for twenty years. The team has won 18 games in 5 years. It can’t get any worse, right?

Buffalo arrives Sunday in Cleveland as one of the biggest surprises of the 2019 season, sporting a 6-2 record and the third-ranked defense in the league. Josh Allen is unspectacular, however, a middling quarterback who’ll turn the ball over. He’s thrown 7 interceptions and fumbled 10 times on the year. He’s dangerous outside the pocket and will use his feet at the first sign of trouble. Cleveland’s defense must force Allen to throw, especially in the red zone. He’s run for 4 touchdowns, and the Bills offense, though they rank 23rd in the league, excel in the red zone. They score touchdowns on 71% of their red zone chances, best in the league, because of Allen’s legs and an efficient running game.

Frank Gore and Devin Singletary split carries in the Buffalo backfield, though Singletary may overtake Gore as the year progresses. He’s averaging 6.7 yards per carry and is coming off his best performance of the year, tallying 95 yards against Washington. Quicker and younger than his counterpart, watch for Singletary’s carries to rise in the coming weeks.


Defensively the Bills lack stars yet continue to dominate. Third in the league in passing yards allowed, Buffalo shuts down opponent’s passing games. Yet to allow a 300 yard passer on the season, Mayfield faces an uphill battle to find any success this week. Quarterbacks complete only 60% of their passes against safeties Jordan Poyer and Micah Hyde and corners Levi Wallace and TreDavious White. They’re in the top five in the league in opponents’ QB rating and passes defended.


It’s difficult to see a path to victory for the Browns this week. They’re facing a confident team while living in a constant state of turmoil. Buffalo possesses the resiliency needed to win the low-scoring game likely on Sunday. The Browns’ offense has shown no propensity to overcome themselves, let alone a top five NFL defense.

The Whip Around

1. Josh Gordon got cut last week by the Patriots and claimed by Seattle, followed by reports of Seahawk players and fans gushing over their newest signing. Gordon is a special talent, but it’s difficult to imagine him succeeding in the NFL, regardless of the situation. He’s led a troubled life and deserves to find the help he needs to sort through his problems. An NFL locker room isn’t that place. Here’s hoping he finds that help.

2. Each week, defensive coordinators scheme to keep from getting beat deep by Tyreek Hill. Each week, they fail.

Chasing down an NFL running back with a 10 yard head start is unthinkable. How much for a Tyreek Hill-Usain Bolt 100M dash?

3. The vaunted Colts offensive line got schooled by the Steelers defensive front on Sunday, giving up 5 sacks, the most on the season. The Colts suddenly look average and injuries are piling up. A month removed from their upset of the Chiefs in Kansas City, Indy needs victories over Miami and Jacksonville over the next two weeks to right the ship before a mammoth trip to Houston in Week 12. Are the Colts a contender fighting through injuries or a team that peaked too early?

4. Speaking of the AFC South, the Texans defense looked the part in London against Jacksonville, but did not pressure Gardner Minshew until he needed to throw late. With a tough schedule that includes Baltimore, Indianapolis, and New England upcoming, the Texans must generate a pass rush. Will J. J. Watt’s injury and the trade of Jadeveon Clowney doom their playoff chances? Or will Deshaun Watson put up so many points that it won’t matter?

5. Philadelphia seems to have righted the ship, posting victories at Buffalo and Chicago after losing 4 of 6. Carson Wentz has regained his accuracy, completing at least 66% of his passes the last two weeks after posting sub 62% percentages in 5 of the 6 weeks preceding. With the 6th best rushing attack to complement Wentz, the Eagles seem poised to begin their yearly chase down of the Cowboys for the NFC East title.

6. The pitchforks are out in Chicago, hunting for the head of Mitchell Trubisky. A year after winning the division, the Bears are 3-5 with an offense unable to score points. While it’s looking likely the Bears will move on from the 2nd pick in the 2017 draft, who could be available to right the ship? Andy Dalton is an option. How many playoff victories does he have? Cam Newton is intriguing if Carolina hands the reins to Kyle Allen, but injuries have mounted for Cam and he’ll be 31 when next season kicks off. The loser of the Gardner Minshew/Nick Foles battle could be available, but Jacksonville would benefit by keeping both since Minshew is cheap. Eli Manning? Please. The best option may be Teddy Bridgewater. He held his own while Drew Brees healed, protecting the ball and allowing the Saints’ extraordinary defense to win games. Sounds like a perfect fit.

7. Lamar Jackson is what happens when an ultra-talented but flawed player falls into the right situation. Only a few organizations are savvy enough to put Jackson in a position to be an MVP candidate. Baltimore has proved again that smart teams win the draft, not because they unearth gems, but because they advance the abilities of their players instead of hindering them. Surrounded by a strong defense and elite running game, the Ravens are making the rest of the AFC North look like fools.

8. Halfway through the season, Josh Jacobs has the Offensive Rookie of the Year award wrapped up. Seventh in the league in rushing yards and tied for fifth in touchdowns, the Raiders’ back is the most impressive rookie in the league this side of Nick Bosa. On some runs, he’s a one cut back, putting a foot in the ground, hitting the hole, and showing off his speed. On others, he flashes an array of moves, jukes, and spins, leaving defenders flummoxed. An ideal combination of speed, power, size, and shiftiness, Jacobs will light up Vegas next year like, well, Vegas.

9. Browns, Jets, Redskins, Bengals. If you were to hitch your wagon to one of these franchises for the next decade which one’s the pick? Jimmy Haslam, Woody Johnson, Dan Snyder, Mike Brown. Maybe just pull the wagon yourself.

10. San Francisco vs. Seattle on Monday Night is the game of the year to this point. An undefeated 49ers squad at home with the best defense in the league against the presumptive MVP Russell Wilson. Richard Sherman squaring off against his old team. Seattle’s defense is the weak link in the matchup; can Pete Carroll scheme a way to slow down the 49er running game? The schedule toughens for San Francisco from here. A loss at home against a division rival could snowball on them. Prediction: the winner of this game wins the NFC West.

All stats courtesy of http://pro-football-reference.com