A Simplistic Triumph is Satisfying, Refreshing in Cleveland

Cleveland Browns, Myles Garrett, NFL

When was the last time the Cleveland Browns posted a ho-hum, boring victory? Sunday’s win against Washington was workmanlike and efficient. Only six penalties, no turnovers, just two sacks allowed. Washington isn’t good and Dwayne Haskins struggled, poor at reading the field and unable to look at another receiver other than his primary target. His inexperience led to three interceptions by the defense and a strip sack by Myles Garrett. The defense wasn’t great, but they took advantage of Haskins. The Browns are 2-1, an ode as much to the schedule than how they’re playing. Washington and Cincinnati are poor, but the Browns handled each at home with relative ease. They’ve scored 30 in back-to-back games for the first time since 2010. To become relevant, they first have to show competency. Kevin Stefanski, through three weeks, has stripped Berea of drama, but the schedule now gets tougher. Can he continue rebuilding the mindset of a schizophrenic franchise against stiffer competition?

Stefanski’s goals on offense are becoming clear. He wants to run the ball behind a strong offensive line with the best duo of backs in the league. The line has been a strength. Wyatt Teller earns high marks as a pulling guard, setting blocks and springing big runs from both Nick Chubb and Kareem Hunt. He was Pro Football Focus’ highest rated guard in the league through the first two weeks of the season and played well against Washington. In the passing game, Stefanski is working mismatches. On the touchdown pass to Kareem Hunt, he lined up wide against a linebacker. Odell Beckham was in the slot, drawing coverage from the corner and the attention of the safety. Easy touchdown.

The offense put Beckham and Jarvis Landry in the slot on multiple occasions, getting covered by linebackers. Baker Mayfield hit each on slants. Easy yards, and defenses must adjust. While Landry and Beckham have only caught a combined 23 passes through three games, defenses must account for them. Play design has this in mind and led to touchdowns from Hunt and tight end Harrison Bryant. The passing game is about to become more important, however, and the wide outs will need more touches.

The defensive line again dominated, the strength of the unit. When the front four fails to make a play, the offense does. Garrett had two sacks. Sheldon Richardson notched a sack, tackle for loss, quarterback hit, and knocked away a Haskins’ pass. They’ll continue to be the only resistance to opposing offenses. While Washington struggled, Terry McLaurin had a decent day in space. He averaged 20 yards per reception, most of those coming after the catch. B.J. Goodson rebounded a bit, picking off a Haskins’ throw and knocking away another. The young QB’s eyes latched onto his receivers at the snap, allowing the secondary and linebackers to anticipate where the ball was going. The Browns took advantage of Haskins’ sloppiness, turning Washington over five times. Next week will be tougher.

A tentative, irresolute Dallas franchise is next. They’re a team full of talent each year, but struggle to an 8-8, 9-7 record season after season. A coaching change from Jason Garrett to Mike McCarthy hasn’t rid them of old habits. They discover alternative ways to lose, and if not for an even more wobbly franchise in Atlanta gifting them a victory in Week 2, the Cowboys would be 0-3. Dallas lacks the mental strength to win consistently. It permeates the franchise from the top down. Jerry Jones insists on having his hands in everything, causing strife within the ranks. They lack discipline in winning time. Take the under before each season on Dallas’ win total.

A shootout awaits in Texas on Sunday. Dallas has the number 1 ranked offense and passing attack in the league. Dak Prescott has a stable of impressive wide receivers at his disposal. They have established big play guys in Amari Cooper and Michael Gallup. The rookie CeeDee Lamb is a nightmare in space. If he’s allowed to run free, good luck. The Browns back seven will struggle. Greedy Williams and Kevin Johnson returning from their injuries this week would help, but Dallas’ talent outside will give them fits. Expect Prescott to flourish Sunday.

Ezekiel Elliott is a problem in the backfield, too. Elliott balances the offense. For the Cleveland defense to have any success, they have to slow the running game. The Browns rank 5th against the run in 2020, allowing only 94 yards per game. If the defense hopes to slow the Cowboys, they must make Dallas one dimensional. The Cowboys have a good offensive line, giving up sacks on only 3.97% of plays, seventh in the league. Cleveland’s front four becomes more important. They need to generate pressure. If they can stifle Elliott and force Prescott to throw, Garrett and company may get to him.

Offensively, the Browns have to score. A lot. Dallas’ defense has been poor on the season, ranking 23rd against the run and 28th against the pass. They’re worst in the NFL, giving up a 126.6 passer rating to opposing quarterbacks, according to PFF. Baker Mayfield, Odell Beckham, and Jarvis Landry all must have big days. The Browns have to take advantage of their weak secondary. A ball control running attack won’t be enough this week. Cleveland’s defense cannot slow the Dallas offense. Mayfield has to keep up. This is the week for the receivers to breakout. Stefanski has shown an ability to hunt mis-matches and to get his play makers in space. He must move Mayfield, in and out of the pocket. KhaDarel Hodge should have a role this week. He’s quick in space. If they can work him and Kareem Hunt into match-ups against linebackers, advantage Cleveland. Dallas is desperate, sitting at 1-2. The Browns will get their best effort. The weak part of the schedule has concluded. Stefanski and company now must show they can game plan and execute against talented, if flawed, opponents. A victory this week would alter the league’s perception of the Browns. Are they a franchise turning the corner, or a fraud beating up on weaklings?

The Whip Around

1.Enter the car and lock the handle bar for the Josh Allen Experience, cause it’s a ride. The Buffalo Bills are 3-0 because Allen is an improved quarterback; he’s second in the league to Russell Wilson in passer rating (124.8). His 10 touchdown passes to 1 interception on 71% completions are numbers worthy of an MVP candidate. Toss in his fullback style running ability (74 yards and 2 touchdowns) and it’s hard to see any flaws. But sometimes….the turnovers and bad decisions are head scratching. The numbers are fantastic, but they’ve come against the Jets, Dolphins, and Rams. His three fumbles are concerning. Aaron Donald’s sack and strip of him on Sunday came 20 yards behind the line of scrimmage as he continued retreating, almost costing his team the game. He led a final drive touchdown, however, benefiting from a ticky tack pass interference call on 4th down. The Bills have talent everywhere, and Allen has matured. But will he be reliable in tight situations against good defenses? His talent is obvious, only the space between his head will decide his ceiling.

2. Detroit has a knack for drafting and developing Pro Bowl cornerbacks. Jeff Okudah is their latest superstar in the secondary. The third overall pick in this year’s draft, Okudah is having an immediate impact on their defense. He confused Kyler Murray multiple times on Sunday, forcing him into poor throws and questionable reads. His pick halfway through the third quarter ended an Arizona drive that would’ve allowed them to retake the lead, and he jumped a wide receiver screen to DeAndre Hopkins for a loss in the red zone. Murray looked confused for the first time this season, and Okudah played a big part in that. He’s good against the run and played Murray well when he scrambled. He’ll take his lumps as a rookie, and Hopkins still had a great day against him (10 catches, 137 yards overall). But Okudah is a star in waiting.

3. The coaching in the NFL still baffles the mind, and even Super Bowl winning coaches aren’t immune. If someone can explain why Doug Pederson, with 1:36 left in overtime, ran the ball 4 times in a row from Cincinnati’s 46 yard line, I’d love to hear it. In effect, settling for a chance at a long field goal, Pederson played for a tie. The Eagles lined up for a 58 yard try but jumped offsides, forcing Pederson to punt. These types of decisions show that coaches are only interested in avoiding second guessing in their post game press conferences. If the kicker missed, he had somewhere else to lay the blame. The timidity on the sidelines on Sundays is frustrating. Anyone ever see this out of Andy Reid or Bill Belichick? The rest of the league needs to take notes from the best game managers.

4. Stefon Diggs is an underrated receiver in the league, perhaps because of his unhappiness in Minnesota and Kirk Cousins the past few years. Anyone blaming him now? His work in the end zone against Jalen Ramsey highlights how he uses his size and speed to get open anywhere on the field. He’s making Josh Allen a better QB.

5. The ‘bust’ label is coming for Sam Darnold. His performance against Indy was abhorrent. 17-29 and 3 picks, two of which got returned for touchdowns. The other occurred in the end zone, costing his team a chance at points. Darnold is smart and strong armed, but the lack of weapons, combined with the buffoonery occurring each week on his own sideline, has handcuffed him. Adam Gase has no business on an NFL sideline and is destroying the confidence of a talented young quarterback. Problem is, when it’s gone, it isn’t coming back. The Jets are ruining Darnold. If something doesn’t change, his career seems headed the way of Tim Couch’s and David Carr’s.

6. Another woe begotten franchise continues to sink. The collective irresolution in Atlanta is hard to watch. Blowing a 19 point second half lead in Dallas to a high-powered offense is one thing. But to crumble, at home, against a Chicago team after they benched starter Mitch Trubisky is just sad. This time the offense deserves the blame. Matt Ryan missed on seven straight fourth quarter throws before tossing a ghastly interception after the Falcons relinquished the lead, overthrowing a wide open Calvin Ridley. There aren’t enough psychiatrists in the Atlanta area to fix what’s going on between the ears of the Falcons’ coaches and players. Time to clean house.

7. Kyler Murray wasn’t at his best against Detroit, but watching him juke his way into the end zone never gets old.

8. Lamar Jackson is a transcend talent. His speed and elusiveness combine with his improving passing skills to make one of the best quarterbacks in the league. But don’t compare him to Patrick Mahomes. It isn’t fair to either of them. Mahomes has a Super Bowl title and MVP on his resume, and he’ll add many more. His arm strength, accuracy, and mobility are unlike anything the league has seen before. For all of Jackson’s talent, he’s quite a few steps below Mahomes as a QB. Jackson’s high completion percentage comes because of defense’s fear of his running ability. He isn’t a pinpoint passer, and it shows when he’s forced into passing situations. When the Ravens trail, Jackson’s effectiveness in blunted. His 0-2 record in the playoffs results from Baltimore getting behind early, forced to throw. The best throwers in the game are at their zenith when trailing in the fourth quarter, making throws into tight windows under pressure. Lamar Jackson may develop into that guy in time, but until he does Baltimore will get exposed against the top teams in the playoffs.

9. Sean Payton’s love for Taysom Hill has reached an uncomfortable level. Why take a Hall of Fame quarterback off the field just to replace him with a fullback? When Hill’s in the backfield, the defense expects a run; he’s only thrown 14 passes in his career. His fumble in the fourth quarter of a tie game on Green Bay’s 41 yard line Sunday night was killer. New Orleans was in prominent position to grab the lead, but gave the ball to Aaron Rodgers with great field position. Yes, Drew Brees has struggled. But what does Hill bring to the offense? If he’s that valuable as a runner, why not line him up in the backfield and hand it to him? At least in that situation, Brees can audible out of a poor play.

10. Bad teams lose, as Minnesota showed against the Titans. The Vikings led for most of the game Sunday, establishing Dalvin Cook in the run game while Justin Jefferson was having a breakout performance (7 catches 175 yards). But Kirk Cousins struck again, just as Tennessee took the lead on a 55 yard field goal with 1:44 left in the game. On the ensuing possession, Cousins fumbled a snap and recovered it before throwing an interception the next play. More than talent, the quarterback position is a mind game. Cousins possesses the talent and has been in the league long enough to gain amble experience for these situations. He just doesn’t have it. The doubt and second guessing in his mind will win more often than not.

All stats courtesy of pro-football-reference.com

Give Thanks for Browns-Steelers

Baker Mayfield, Cleveland Browns, Joe Schobert, NFL

Each passing week is a test for the Cleveland Browns. Is their play on the field improving? Are they disciplined? Is the young team and its rookie coach maturing? Considering all that has occurred during the 2019 season, this organization must prove it is ready to grow up. Are they a playoff contender?

The Dolphins are a pushover, but Sunday was a start. Despite a third quarter lull, both sides of the ball reacted well to the hectic week. Take nothing for granted with this group, beating up on a tanking Miami squad wasn’t a given. Seven penalties committed was good, not great, and aside from the interception Baker Mayfield threw behind Odell Beckham Jr on a slant, the turnover problem has subsided. Mayfield seems calmer in the pocket than earlier in the season, though he still has a tendency to bail early. It’s clear at this point he’s more comfortable on the move, giving himself space and wider throwing lanes to get rid of the ball. Not ideal, but whatever it takes for the QB to get comfortable. Freddie Kitchens has also called more play action (where did he get that idea from?), allowing Mayfield to play to his strengths.

While the defense missed Myles Garrett and Larry Ogunjobi, they recorded four sacks on Ryan Fitzpatrick and increased the pressure as the game progressed. It’s no longer a secret the force Joe Schobert has become; two more interceptions and four other passes broken up have cemented his Pro Bowl season. The linebacker isn’t the only defender flexing on opposing offenses, however. Overlooked by his more famous line mates, Sheldon Richardson has taken over games from the center of the defensive line.

Richardson’s dominant play couldn’t have come at a better time. With two new pass rushers in Chad Thomas and Chris Smith starting on the ends, Richardson is drawing attention from the edges, giving the ends chances to make plays in one-on-one battles against opposing tackles. His two sacks on Sunday set the tone for a defense with questions concerning how much pressure they’ll be able to generate on opposing QBs.

Nick Chubb leads the league in carries and trails Christian McCaffrey by only six yards in the chase for the rushing title. He’s been electric the entire year, a steady force during a wobbly season. Chubb is the team MVP, and for the Browns to run the table and force their way into the AFC playoffs he will need to continue to carry the water. His blend of speed, power, vision, and patience are unmatched in the league. His heart and attitude are an ideal fit with the city of Cleveland.

But can we stop the fist pounding when a play that doesn’t involve him fails? Chubb is on pace for 323 carries, which would be the most in the league since Adrian Peterson had 327 in 2015. He’s getting enough touches. Like it or not, winning NFL games now requires establishing a passing game to get a lead, then running the ball to bleed clock. The days of backs with 400 carries are over. To win in the NFL, to be a perennial playoff team and Super Bowl contender, offenses must throw the ball. The fate of this team ultimately relies upon Baker Mayfield, Jarvis Landry, and Odell Beckham. Chubb is a force, the ultimate luxury for an offense. If he remains the best offensive player, however, the franchise will continue to fall short of their goals.

For the second time in three weeks, a date with the Steelers. As if enough wasn’t already on the line, the lingering effects of the Thursday night brawl will hang over Heinz Field on Sunday. Again, the Browns will need to prove they’ve matured over the course of the season. The crowd will be loud and angry. On defense they cannot commit dumb penalties. The Steelers offense is poor, starting third-string quarterback Devlin Hodges and likely without running back James Conner. Pittsburgh’s only score in Cleveland resulted when the defense racked up 58 yards of penalties on the drive. The Steeler offense only managed 16 points against Cincinnati, the worst defense yardage wise in the league. If the Browns don’t give them free yards, Pittsburgh won’t be able to score.

The playoffs are on the line Sunday. According to FiveThirtyEight.com, the Browns’ playoff chances are 29%, the Steelers’ 27%. A win Sunday boosts the odds to 50%, a loss drops them to 10%. The Steelers are injury riddled and have lost momentum built during a four game win streak after a loss to Baltimore. The adversity faced has made the Browns a tighter, tougher, bunch. Cleveland will need that Sunday. Their last win in Heinz Field was 2003. They haven’t swept the Steelers since 1988.

Thirty-one years. Unbelievable.

The Whip Around

1. The Cowboys lose when playing winning squads. Now 0-4 on the year when facing teams above .500, the kicking game was the culprit in New England. A missed field goal in the 1st quarter by Brett Maher wasted a tone setting drive, and a blocked punt set up the only touchdown of the day for the Patriots. On weather days like Sunday in New England, special teams are critical. Dallas showed themselves once again.

2. The reasons for dismissing San Francisco as a Super Bowl contender are drying up. While New England’s defense is better numbers wise, San Fran’s defensive line engulfs offenses. Their latest victim, Aaron Rodgers, hasn’t looked that inept since entering the league. Though Jimmy Garoppolo is still a question mark in tight games, the 49er defense seems determined to remove him from the equation. Home field advantage will be key. If they can get teams to the Bay Area, instead of having to go to Lambeau or New Orleans, the Niners have a real chance to be playing in February.

3. Week after week, Russell Wilson throws the most beautiful passes.

4. He’s unlike anything the NFL has ever seen, and I’ve given up on doubting Lamar Jackson. The new front runner for MVP, Jackson has proved he’s the most dangerous weapon in the league. Overwhelmed by his speed, defenses have no answer for his playmaking. The Ravens offense is on pace for the fewest punts ever during a 16 game season and haven’t punted on a Lamar Jackson-led drive since Week 9. Jackson finds different ways to torch defenses. He throws from unorthodox arm angles. Terrified of his running ability, rushers hesitate when pressuring him. According to nextgenstats.com, he’s faced the lowest pressure rate in the league at 21.1%. When teams blitz, he’s burned them, throwing a touchdown on 13.8% of attempts against the blitz. No other QB is higher than 11%. Lamar Jackson changes the way teams play defense then takes advantage when they’re out of their comfort zone. He’s unguardable.

5. After weeks and weeks of not overturning any pass interference calls via replay, the NFL flipped two on Sunday. Why? An overturn in the Browns game was iffy, but occurred with Cleveland already up 21-0. Another in the Panthers-Saints game could have affected the outcome. On third down and Carolina at the five yard line with 2:30 left in the game, the replay officials gave the Panthers a new set of downs. The NFL is responding to outside noise, allowing criticism to seep into the replay center’s interpretation of the rule book. If the league can’t decide how to officiate the game, they’ll continue losing fans’ interest.

6. Michael Thomas has 104 catches on the year and is on pace to break the Marvin Harrison’s record of 143 grabs in a season. We overlook Thomas when discussing the best receivers in the game. He isn’t flashy, just consistent. A precise route runner with sure hands, Drew Brees can trust Thomas will be where he’s supposed to be and that he’ll catch the football. He was Teddy Bridgewater’s safety valve during Brees’ injury, a huge reason Bridgewater didn’t turn the ball over and the Saints kept winning. The most interesting story in the league during the playoffs will be the Saints. Can they overcome the devastating losses they’ve endured the past two postseasons? If they win a Super Bowl, Thomas, not Brees, may end up being the reason.

7. Speaking of receivers, the story of DeAndre Hopkins and his mother is inspiring. A wonderful receiver and beautiful person.

8. Oakland has slithered their way into playoff contention, though they got throttled by the Jets on Sunday. The 34-3 loss damaged the Raiders chances, and a matchup this week in Kansas City will likely derail them further. The AFC wild card contenders- Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Oakland, Indianapolis, and Tennessee- are a gangly, uneven troupe. Who gets hot and earns a playoff berth?

9. The NFC picture is clearer. New Orleans is a lock; they lead their division by 3 games. Green Bay and Minnesota are both 8-3. One will win the division, the other a wild card. Same with San Francisco and Seattle out West. Either Dallas or Philadelphia has to win the sorry East. While most expect a Baltimore-New England AFC title game (don’t sleep on K.C.), this side of the bracket should scintillate. The Niners look unstoppable at the moment, but start the weakest quarterback. Brees, Rodgers, and Wilson have been through the battles. Who the hell knows about Minnesota. The Super Bowl representative from the NFC will earn the trip.

10. A San Francisco-Baltimore match-up this week is an NFL executive’s dream. The only problem? With a myriad of high profile games taking place on Thanksgiving weekend, this one is a Sunday afternoon, 1 o’clock tilt. The best defensive front in the league against Lamar Jackson and the Baltimore running game will provide an attractive battle in the trenches. Baltimore should still score. Has anyone looked capable of slowing them down? This is a huge test for Jimmy Garoppolo. He must put up 20 to give San Fran a chance.

Happy Thanksgiving to all and thank you for supporting this little project I’ve undertaken. Enjoy your friends and family this weekend and all weekends. A home filled with laughter, a hug from a loved one; the little things provide the most meaning. Celebrate the mundane and embrace the crazy. And have that second piece of pie. You’ve earned it.

 

Browns-Steelers: Renewed Rivalry?

Baker Mayfield, Cleveland Browns, Freddie Kitchens, Jarvis landry, Odell Beckham

The Cleveland Browns, an enigma wrapped in drama and dysfunction, won for the first time since September on Sunday, earning a reprieve, for a few days anyway, from the pressure and tension of a disappointing season. So goes life in the NFL. Win and you’re heroic. Lose and you’re a bum. Was the victory a mirage, or are things improving?


Depends on who’s answering the question.


The penalties and turnovers are dropping. Over the past two weeks, the team hasn’t turned the ball over and has had 9 flags thrown on them for 110 yards, a good half earlier in the year. These are signs that discipline is being instilled and the players are taking to the coaching. Whatever the problems they’ve faced over 9 games, team unity hasn’t been one. Despite the horrid start, the players stick up for each other on the field and in the media, not letting the outside noise divide them. If there’s a sign that they have it in them to win 5 or 6 in a row, this is it.


For all the Freddie Kitchens’ hate, and he’s been bad, his poor choices and head scratching decisions have mostly come from a place of aggression.


A draw play on 4th and 9.


Calling timeout at the end of the first half against Seattle, before Baker Mayfield threw a pick and gave the Seahawks a chance to score.


Multiple times choosing to go for first downs in the red zone instead of kicking field goals.


Taking the ball to start games earlier in the season.

Calling deep drops and routes on passing plays with the offense struggling to create enough time for those routes to be successful.


The penalties and turnovers.


All these issues point to a level of incompetence from the coaching staff. At least, however, the head coach isn’t sitting on his hands, letting other teams dictate the action. Luck favors the aggressor.


It was brutal watching the offense fail to score on 8 consecutive snaps from the one yard line. Pee Wee teams would have lucked into a score on 8 tries. The offense has a mental problem in the red zone more so than a physical one. Nick Chubb pulled up on one run, cutting it inside instead of outrunning the defender to the corner. Odell Beckham and Jarvis Landry both lost one-on-one matchups in the end zone. Baker is fidgety, afraid of a turnover. The play calling isn’t the problem; execution of those plays was lacking.


The final touchdown, however, was brilliance from the players and staff. By lining Beckham and Landry on the left side of the offense and Rashard Higgins alone on the right, Kitchens forced the defense’s attention left, giving Higgins a one-on-one matchup, which he won, and allowing Baker to make a beautiful throw.

Defense’s attention on the left side of the play and the backfield. Higgins (top) 1 on 1 with the corner


With Kareem Hunt’s return, the Browns’ backfield is as dynamic as any in the league. Hunt was outstanding Sunday, providing a glimpse of what the offense can be if they perfect the timing and execution. A devastating lead blocker for Chubb, Hunt paved multiple running lanes for his teammate while catching 7 balls for 44 yards. Nick Chubb, Odell Beckham, Jarvis Landry, Kareem Hunt, Rashard Higgins, and Baker Mayfield. This offense is out of excuses. Get the ball into the playmakers’ hands and let them win games.


Now a Thursday nighter, at home, against the Pittsburgh Steelers. A division rival. Hated for their smugness and success. An organization that has everything this one craves. The only team pompous enough to put their logo on just one side of their helmet.


The Steelers have won four in a row after a 1-4 start. Mason Rudolph, Ben Roethlisberger’s replacement at quarterback, has been fine, completing 65% of his passes and throwing 11 touchdowns to 4 interceptions. He’s not completing passes downfield, however, averaging only 6.6 yards per attempt, 32nd in the league. The Steeler offense is in QB protection mode. They aren’t running the ball well either, though, ranking 27th in the league in rushing yards and 28th in yards per rush. The Browns defense must dominate Thursday.


Pittsburgh’s resurgence is linked to its defense. Second in the league in turnovers forced, they’ve feasted on other teams’ mistakes. Otherwise they’re slightly above average, ranking 12th in passing yards and 16th in rushing yards surrendered. Minkah Fitzpatrick, a safety picked up from Miami for a 1st round pick, has 5 interceptions on the year. Rookie linebacker Devin Bush has forced 4 fumbles. T.J. Watt has 9.5 sacks. Slowing these three will be key.

While the front seven is formidable, the secondary is a weakness. Plays designed to get the ball out of Mayfield’s hands and into his playmakers’ will be key.


The Pittsburgh front seven will try to harass Baker into turnovers. Expect blitzes from all over. Cam Heyward is a disruptive force at defensive tackle, and Bud Dupree is having a breakout year, already tying his career high with 6 sacks.


Turnovers, turnovers, turnovers. If the Browns avoid them, they have an outstanding chance to win. Pittsburgh cannot keep up with Cleveland’s offensive talent. Can they execute?


This is the week. The Steelers have dominated the Browns since the return. If this franchise is anywhere close to overturning the culture of losing and becoming a perennial playoff contender, they must beat the Steelers. Browns punters have been kicked in the face, fans have been body slammed, and the organization has been embarrassed regularly by their rival. To earn any respect in the NFL, you must win division games. The failures of the season can be forgotten with 2 victories over Pittsburgh in the next 3 weeks. Thursday Night will show whether this team believes in themselves.

The disrespect is palpable

The Whip Around

1. The Colts are stumbling, lost without Jacoby Brissett and T. Y. Hilton. A loss to Miami is inexcusable, however, regardless of who’s playing. Linebacker Darius Leonard tried single-handedly to avoid the embarrassment, tallying 11 tackles, a sack, a forced fumble, and an interception. One of the game’s best linebackers, Leonard and the Colts’ defense is being hung out to dry by their offense in recent weeks. Things haven’t looked the same for Indy since their upset in Kansas City. With three games on deck with division rivals in the jumbled AFC South, the Colts may play their way out of the playoff hunt, unfathomable a month ago.

2. Wide receiver screens are one of the most popular plays in offensive coordinators’ play books, yet seem to fail more often than not. One problem is when they’re called. Against zone defenses, when corners and safeties play farther off the line, receivers have room to operate and are gaining yardage on the quick throws. Too often, however, they’re called against man defense. Corners are attacking the receiver at the snap, causing lost yardage on most plays. Good quarterbacks read this and audible in or out of the play according to what the defense is showing. Bad QBs aren’t. Coordinators need to give their signal callers more freedom to get out of these lost plays when they see corners pressing up against their receivers.

3. Lamar Jackson has at least one highlight play per week. He’s creeping into Michael Vick territory.

4. Genius Sean McVay must skip his Mensa meetings. His innovative offense is being bogged down by penalties, turnovers, drops, and poor quarterback play. While the offensive line has been a disaster because of injuries and off-season losses, that’s no excuse. McVay is purported to be an offensive mastermind, capable of turning average players into Pro Bowlers. His 134 million dollar quarterback is regressing and his star running back has arthritis in his knee while playing in the toughest division in football. May be time to stop labeling football coaches geniuses.

5. If Aaron Rodgers is going to win another Super Bowl, this may be the year. Aaron Jones is having a breakout year, tied for the league lead in touchdowns and 10th in yards from scrimmage. He’s a threat as a runner and receiver, giving Rodgers another weapon to go to in crunch time other than Davante Adams. Green Bay hasn’t had as dangerous a runner since Ahman Green.

6. Ron Rivera made an outstanding coaching move Sunday, going for two after scoring a touchdown trailing by 14. Conventional wisdom says kick the extra point and get within 7. Going for two, however, gives the team better odds of winning. If you miss the 2, which they did, you’re still only down 8 and can tie with a score and 2 point conversion. If you succeed, you’re down six and can win with a TD and extra point. Overtime in the NFL is a crap shoot. Teams are better off doing whatever they must to win in regulation.

7. Kyle Allen has taken the Carolina quarterback job from Cam Newton, injuries or no. Throws like this are why. Allen can be special.

Tough throw between 3 defenders

8. On his best day, Josh Allen in an average quarterback. He doesn’t have the accuracy or field vision necessary to succeed long term in the NFL. He can run and has a strong arm, though, qualities that will tantalize QB needy GMs for years to come. If Buffalo sneaks into the playoffs, it will be due to a combination of their defense and a crappy AFC.

9. The difference between quarterbacks on Monday Night was stark. While his team possesses more talent at nearly every position and was at home, Jimmy Garoppolo isn’t good enough to compete with Russell Wilson. No matter how well the 49er defense and running game perform, Garoppolo’s shortcomings will get exposed in crucial moments. Too often, his throws are off target and he doesn’t know what to do with himself inside the pocket. Come playoff time, San Francisco stands little chance against the Saints, Seahawks, or Packers, regardless of venue.

10. The annual Tennessee Beat a Super Bowl Contender Bowl was held Sunday, with the Titans upending the Chiefs in Patrick Mahomes’ return. Mahomes was outstanding, but Derrick Henry ran for 188 yards, Tennessee’s defense recovered a fumble for a touchdown, and K.C. botched a late field goal attempt that would have sealed the victory to keep the Titans’ playoff hopes alive. The Titans play up or down to their competition, surrounding head scratching losses with unforeseen victories. You tell me what they are.

 

Will the Real Baker Mayfield Please Stand Up

Baker Mayfield, Cleveland Browns, NFL, Uncategorized

Baker Mayfield is lost, and he’s running from the light. Many want to pin the loss Sunday night on Freddie Kitchens, and he deserves blame. But this L is Mayfield’s.


You cannot win in the NFL with poor quarterback play. The Browns have proved this for 20 years. You can hand wring and fist stomp about the coaching, receivers, offensive linemen, and defense. Success hinges on the quarterback. The good ones are in the playoffs; the great ones win Super Bowls. We’ve seen the results of bad ones.


Right now, Mayfield is bad. I think he will pull himself out of it, but his season has been hard to watch. He is the cause of the 1-2 record and the offense looking lost. Baker is the reason I felt this franchise was ready to overturn 20 years of misery, yet so far, he’s adding to it.


He’s inaccurate. Whether down field, or on check downs, his accuracy has disappeared, completing only 56.9% of his passes, 30th in the league.


He’s not comfortable in the pocket.


He’s been under pressure, but he’s running himself into it as well. Too often, Baker gets spooked at a small push by the defensive front and heads for the exit. Almost exclusively, he drops further back and to his right. This closes off the left side of the field as an option, forcing him into throwing to one side of the field.

He’s bailing. More options if he steps up in the pocket, or shuffles his feet to the right instead of turning and running


Watch Tom Brady, Patrick Mahomes, and Aaron Rodgers. The devil is in the details. Their footwork in the pocket is precise. Instead of scrambling at the first sign of trouble, they adjust their bodies away from the pressure, buying themselves the half second they need to find the open receiver. It’s a small but essential detail the great quarterbacks possess.

Footwork is key to avoiding the rush


He needs to step up in the pocket instead of running backward. When a quarterback backs up, the play is over. Unless they’re a scrambler, by reversing course they are taking themselves out of the play. Russell Wilson is one of the few in history to have success backing up in the pocket. By stepping up, Baker will improve his field vision, passing lanes, and accuracy.


I believe in Baker. He’s smart. A hard worker. He’s been an accurate passer in college and his rookie year. Many great quarterbacks slump their sophomore year. The Browns will not improve until he does, however.

The Browns are in the mist of the toughest part of the schedule. After Baltimore on Sunday, they have the 49ers, Seahawks, the bye, then the Patriots. After that, it eases.


At Broncos
Bills
Steelers
Dolphins
At Steelers
Bengals
At Cardinals
Ravens
At Bengals


Plenty of wins there. If they can hang in the next four weeks, they should begin stacking wins.

The defense was outstanding Sunday night. Missing their captain, Christian Kirksey, and the starting secondary, they forced three turnovers on outstanding plays by Myles Garrett, T. J. Carrie, and Joe Schobert. Mack Wilson held his own replacing Kirksey. Steve Wilks blitzed more often than in the first two games of the year. It led to an average day from Todd Gurley and Jared Goff. With a front four as dominant as the Browns’, it makes the secondary’s job much easier. While the offense is rounding into shape, the defense must continue to carry the team.

It’s a big week. Heading to Baltimore, Kitchens and Mayfield are under the microscope. Both must perform better than they’ve shown. A loss to the Ravens would put them 1-3 and two games behind in the division.


Baltimore lost to Kansas City and looked average. They were out of the game after their first drive of the day yielded a touchdown, despite the final score. Lamar Jackson heaved two prayers that got answered, keeping the score close, and Kansas City seemed to sleepwalk through the second half.


The Ravens are flawed. Their defense lost last season’s leading tackler(C.J. Mosley), sack leader, and a Pro Bowler at safety(Eric Weddle). They did add Earl Thomas, maybe the best safety in the game. The Chiefs and Cardinals moved the ball against them at will. If Baker remains patient, there will be plays on the outside to Beckham and Landry. He needs to put the hype and the pressure behind him. A good outing on Sunday will cure many of his ills.


Offensively, the Ravens are Lamar Jackson. He is a crap shoot. One minute he’ll drop a perfect lob into Marquis Brown’s hands; the next he’ll rifle the ball five feet in front of Mark Andrews. The two Hail Mary balls he heaved Sunday should have been picks. The Browns D is better than Kansas City’s. They must take advantage when Jackson makes mistakes.

Keeping Jackson in the pocket is paramount. The Chiefs shadowed him on passing plays, dropping defensive tackle Xavier Williams off the line of scrimmage at the snap to mirror Jackson on a majority of plays. While Jackson sprinkled in a few highlights, holding him to 46 yards rushing was a victory for the Chiefs. The Browns should use this strategy. Mix it up. Use Mack Wilson, Olivier Vernon, and whichever safeties may play in different situations to shadow Lamar. Confuse him into mistakes. If the Browns can keep Jackson and Mark Ingram in check, and the offense can make improvements, they have a shot at winning in Baltimore.

The Whip Around

1.Chiefs Patriots Rams Saints
These teams are the class of the NFL. Other outfits have shown flashes, but none come close to the dominance of these four. The only loss between them is the Rams victory after Drew Brees’ thumb injury. A lot of season remains, yet, barring injury, it’s tough to foresee anyone other than these guys in the conference championships.

2. Colts Texans Cowboys Eagles Packers
The next tier, if one of the above should falter, these teams would be the best bets to slide up. The Packers defense has been phenomenal to this point. If Aaron Rodgers can put full games together, instead of halves, Green Bay will be a feisty out. The Texans are a high-wire act, and DeShaun Watson may be the best quarterback in the league this side of Patrick Mahomes. I still believe in the Eagles and not the Cowboys.

3. Jacoby Brissett has been outstanding, giving the Colts hope for life after Andrew Luck. Seventh in completion percentage, fourth in touchdowns, and sixth in the league in quarterback rating, Brissett is leading a talented team as well as Luck could have. T. Y. Hilton re-aggravated a quad injury, which could hurt their offense depending on how much time he misses. For a team that was staring at doomsday prophecies a month ago, they look to be one on the better teams in the AFC.

4. The athleticism on display each Sunday is mind-boggling. It’s impossible to keep up with the draw dropping plays. In twenty minutes Sunday, Dalvin Cook, Nelson Agholor, and Demarcus Robinson scored touchdowns that run on loop all week on SportsCenter. Beautiful to watch.

5. The Lions upset of the Eagles in Philadelphia was impressive, though Philly was missing their top two receivers. Still, the Lions are undefeated and threatening to remain in the NFC North race past September. One key reason for Sunday’s victory was their secondary. They smothered the healthy Eagles receivers, giving Carson Wentz little space to make throws, tallying an impressive 10 passes defended. The schedule gets tough, however, with Kansas City, Green Bay, and Minnesota on tap. Their secondary will need more days like Sunday for the Lions to remain competitive.

The Detroit secondary has Philly’s receivers blanketed

6. Get up, Donte Jackson.

7. Mike Evans may be the best receiver in the league no one talks about. His erratic quarterback has a lot to do with that, however. Case in point, his game Sunday. 7 catches, 146 yards, and 3 touchdowns in the first half. 2 catches 44 yards in the second. Jameis Winston is infuriating, wasting Evans’ talent.

8. A pet peeve of mine is the slowness with which teams break the huddle. How many timeouts are wasted and 5 yard delay of game penalties taken each week because of this nonsense? They should have taken care of this stuff of the first week of training camp. It boggles my mind that Aaron Rodgers, after many years in the league, can have three instances a game when he can’t get a play off in time. Hurry up.

9. Kyle Allen made throw after throw in leading Carolina’s destruction of the Cardinals on Sunday. 4 touchdowns and a 144.4 QB rating gets your attention. If he keeps playing this well, the Panthers will have a Cam Newton decision to make.

10. After the aforementioned top teams, the rest of the league is a crap shoot. Quarterback play is unstable week to week, even series to series. There aren’t enough consistent guys under center to know what you’re getting each Sunday. It makes for exciting football during the season and gives quite a few teams hope. The inevitability of the top teams winning in January will become more obvious in November and December, however.